Friday, June 24, 2016

Follow Friday - 261 Was Kathrine Switzer's Bib Number When She Became the First Woman to Run the Boston Marathon


It's Friday again, and this means it's time for Follow Friday. There has been a slight change to the format, as now there are two Follow Friday hosts blogs and a single Follow Friday Featured Blogger each week. To join the fun and make now book blogger friends, just follow these simple rules:
  1. Follow both of the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (Parajunkee and Alison Can Read) and any one else you want to follow on the list.
  2. Follow the Featured Blogger of the week - Mikayla's Bookshelf.
  3. Put your Blog name and URL in the Linky thing.
  4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments.
  5. Follow, follow, follow as many as you can, as many as you want, or just follow a few. The whole point is to make new friends and find new blogs. Also, don't just follow, comment and say hi. Another blogger might not know you are a new follower if you don't say "Hi".
  6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the love . . . and the followers.
  7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
  8. If you're new to the Follow Friday Hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
And now for the Follow Friday Question: Name one or more standalone books that you wish was a series.

I'm going to pick a book that was originally supposed to have a sequel, but which still does not. Stars in My Pocket, Like Grains of Sand by Samuel R. Delany was originally published in 1984. When it was published, Delany intended to follow it up with a book titled The Splendor and Misery of Bodies, of Cities, but this sequel remains unfinished, and sadly will probably never be completed. I hold out some small hope, because Delany is still alive and a miracle might happen that motivates him to complete this long-unfinished work, but the reality is that he has shown no interest in it in decades.

Despite this, I keep hoping because Stars in My Pocket, Like Grains of Sand is a brilliant work of science fiction. Set in a distant future in which humanity has spread out over thousands of star systems dominated by two loose alliances - the permissive Sygn, and the conservative Family. These two alliances exist to try to prevent the phenomenon of "cultural fugue", a destructive cycle in which runaway social and technological complexity combine into a force that results in the complete annihilation of entire planetary populations.

The book centers on a relationship between "Rat" Korga, a tall social malcontent who has undergone an extreme medical procedure called "radical anxiety termination" and is the only known survivor of a planet that has undergone cultural fugue, and Marq Dyeth, an industrial diplomat who lives on a planet humanity shares with the three-gendered evelm. The two are determined to be a perfect match by the WEB and Rat is equipped with a device that overcomes his near total lobotomization and sent to meet Marq. Much of the meat of the book surrounds their very short relationship, and uses this to explore the sexual dynamics, cultural implications, and political relations of this distant and alien, but still very human society that Delany conceived.

The book does have an ending and so is more or less able to stand alone, but as one might expect for a book that was originally conceived of as a diptych, that ending is somewhat ambiguous and vaguely unsatisfying. The personal and professional conditions under which Delany wrote Stars in My Pocket, Like Grains of Sand are long gone, and are extremely unlikely to ever be replicated, so we will likely never see the promised conclusion to this two-part series. I can only hope that there is an alternate reality out there somewhere in which The Splendor and Misery of Bodies, of Cities was written, and that maybe circumstances will turn in such a way that a copy from this alternate reality will wind up in my hands someday.


Follow Friday     Home

Monday, June 20, 2016

Musical Monday - Time to Say Goodbye by Andrea Bocelli and Sarah Brightman


My son graduated from high school last Thursday. To be honest, there were times that I was concerned he might not make it, but there he was, crossing the stage with the rest of his class and getting his diploma. I'm still worried for him, but he's gotten over this hurdle, and with luck, he'll be able to navigate the waters ahead.

As part of the graduation ceremony, the school choir sang Time to Say Goodbye. Though they aren't quite as good as Bocelli and Brightman, they were still excellent. I may be biased a bit, as my daughter is in the choir, but they captured the tone of the moment perfectly. The rest of you just have to listen to Bocelli and Brightman and imagine what my daughter might have sounded like.

Previous Musical Monday: Nun Fight by Paul & Storm

Andrea Bocelli     Sarah Brightman     Musical Monday     Home

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Book Blogger Hop June 17th - June 23rd: The Alfa Romeo 158/159 Was a Grand Prix and Formula One Racing Car Used Primarily from 1937 to 1953

Book Blogger Hop

Jen at Crazy for Books restarted her weekly Book Blogger Hop to help book bloggers connect with one another, but then couldn't continue, so she handed the hosting responsibilities off to Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. The only requirements to participate in the Hop are to write and link a post answering the weekly question and then visit other blogs that are also participating to see if you like their blog and would like to follow them.

This week Billy asks: Do you have your photo in your profile?

I have a photo of myself in my Google+ profile. It is an older photo taken on the day I earned my black belt in Tae Kwon Do. Maybe one of these days Google+ will be relevant again, and then I will update the photo.

I do not have a photo of myself on my "Who I Am" page here. Instead, I have some mostly outdated pictures of my book shelves. I suppose I could update my page here to put my picture on it, but for the most part it is pretty easy to find pictures of me on this blog, so I may not ever bother.


Book Blogger Hop     Home

Friday, June 17, 2016

Follow Friday - Benjamin Franklin Created the Franklin Magic Square with a Magic Constant of 260


It's Friday again, and this means it's time for Follow Friday. There has been a slight change to the format, as now there are two Follow Friday hosts blogs and a single Follow Friday Featured Blogger each week. To join the fun and make now book blogger friends, just follow these simple rules:
  1. Follow both of the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (Parajunkee and Alison Can Read) and any one else you want to follow on the list.
  2. Follow the Featured Blogger of the week - Novel Knight.
  3. Put your Blog name and URL in the Linky thing.
  4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments.
  5. Follow, follow, follow as many as you can, as many as you want, or just follow a few. The whole point is to make new friends and find new blogs. Also, don't just follow, comment and say hi. Another blogger might not know you are a new follower if you don't say "Hi".
  6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the love . . . and the followers.
  7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
  8. If you're new to the Follow Friday Hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
And now for the Follow Friday Question: Five websites you love to lurk around that are not shopping sites.

Only five? This is going to be difficult. With apologies to great sites like Clarkesworld, Whatever, and io9, here are my top five:

File 770: This is the best place to get day to day news about what is happening in the science fiction and fantasy community. Run by Mike Glyer, the site posts daily round-ups linking to and providing excerpt from an array of blogs, award sites, convention sites, and other places. File 770 also posts other articles on various topical issues ranging from interviews with Chinese science fiction authors to information about scholarship being done with respect to the works of authors such as Ray Bradbury and J.R.R. Tolkien.

LibraryThing: LibraryThing is my favorite book cataloging site. In practical terms, it is the only book cataloging site that I use. While I do have a Goodreads account, I have used it so rarely that it may as well not exist. I have my entire book library cataloged on LibraryThing and I use their review writing function to create the4 first drafts of all my book reviews.

Locus Online: While reading File 770 will keep one abreast of the news of the science fiction and fantasy community, reading Locus Online will keep one informed of the doings of the science fiction and fantasy publishing world. With articles about awards and interviews with authors, editors, and publishers, this site has all the news anyone could ever want about the doings of the genre book publishing world.

TwentySided: Originally created by Shamus Young as his personal website, TwentySided has grown into a shared blog with a half-dozen contributors. The website primarily features articles about computer gaming and game design, but it also features articles about tabletop gaming, extended analysis about how computer games work and how their stories are put together, as well as humorous deconstructions of several different video game tropes. This site is home to the Spoiler Warning YouTube show and the Diecast podcast. It is also the home of the DM of the Rings webcomic.

Tor.com: Tor.com was originally created by the genre fiction publisher Tor, but has since been spun off into its own quasi-independent entity. Although Tor.com has a very well-written blog with articles on a wide variety of topics, the best part of the website is the fiction, which, by and large, is top notch work. Tor.com is also home to the Rocket Talk podcast.


Follow Friday     Home

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Review - African American Army Officers of World War I: A Vanguard of Equality in War and Beyond by Adam P. Wilson


Short review: An account of how African Americans answered their country's call in World War I hoping their dedication and service would pave the way for equality and justice for their community. Instead, they faced racism and hostility, but emerged from the war as leaders dedicated to changing the world they lived in.

Haiku
During World War I
A community rallied
To confirm their worth

Disclosure: I received this book as part of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program. Some people think this may bias a reviewer so I am making sure to put this information up front. I don't think it biases my reviews, but I'll let others be the judge of that.

Full review: U.S. history can be thought of in two very different ways. On the one hand, there is the version of history that most school children are taught that seems to have inspired such properties as the History Rock portions of Schoolhouse Rock and which dominates the nostalgia-filled speeches of politicians. In this version of history, the U.S. is a shining city on a hill, built by idealists upon the principles of liberty and freedom after throwing off the yoke of British tyranny. In this version, the U.S. became a champion of progress and democracy, a nation filled with exceptional people that had an exceptional role in the world. On the other, there is reality, which is a version of history that is far less inspiring, but also far more interesting. African American Army Officers of World War I is about the second, very real version of U.S. history, and is an unflinching examination of some of the the best and worst aspects of U.S. history.

In 1915 and 1916, with the prospect of entering the raging war in Europe dominating many minds in the United States, prominent members of the African-American community began pushing for black candidates be trained as officers in the American army. As early as July 1916, calls were made for a training camp to be established for African-American men to receive training that would prepare them to be officer candidates in the event of American entry into the war. Given the title of this book, it should come as no surprise that after much political maneuvering and effort, the Fort Des Moines Training Camp for Colored Officers was established in 1917 with an initial class of 1,250 candidates drawn from the black community - 250 to come from the ranks of non commissioned officers already serving in the U.S. Army, and the rest to be drawn from the civilian population. This book is the account of the push for the creation of this camp, the controversies that surrounding its formation and operation, and the men who served first in its program and then as officers in the U.S. Army during World War I, and the profound ways in which these men shaped the United States following the war.

African-American soldiers have served in all of the was waged by the United States. The black regiments raised by the Union during the U.S. Civil War, such as the 54th Massachusetts, are well known, as are the unites of black "Buffalo Soldiers" who served on the frontier, but black soldiers also fought in the American Revolution and the War of 1812 (although not all served on the side of the U.S.). Wilson documents this history of black service in the first chapter of African American Army Officers of World War I to give the context in which the debate over creating a segregated camp to train African-American officers for services in the army took place.

The most critical observation of the period between the U.S. Civil War and the establishment of the training camp at Fort Des Moines is the dichotomy between the aspirational language used in the laws concerning black service in the U.S. armed forces, and the actually under which they were implemented. Formally there was no legal impediment to black candidates entering the service academies at Annapolis and West Point, but in practice the deficiencies in the education afforded to most black citizens and the reluctance of the legislative branch to recommend such candidates meant that very few could even gain admission. Even if a black candidate did gain admission to one of the service academies, the environment was so hostile that very few managed to graduate - between the U.S. Civil War and U.S. entry into World War I, only a handful of black soldiers managed to graduate and secure positions as officers, the most successful of which was Lieutenant Colonel Charles Young whose career seems to have been hampered by the Army's efforts to ensure that he was never placed in a position where he would command white troops, going to far as to have him forced into retirement for medical reasons rather than promote the officer to Brigadier rank.

This official equality and practical discrimination was replicated in the enlisted ranks, most notably in an instance in Brownsville, Texas in which a company of black soldiers assigned to the army installation there aroused such hatred from the local populace that the locals threatened to meet the incoming soldiers with a posse to drive them out. After the soldiers had been stationed there, an incident in which the soldiers were almost certainly merely defending themselves resulted in an inquest after which President Theodore Roosevelt sided with the locals and had all of the black soldiers present dishonorably discharged. This should come as little surprise considering Roosevelt's disparaging remarks concerning the black soldiers who served with him in the Spanish-American War. Time and again, official equality for blacks in the armed services was undermined by a practical application of the rules that was anything but even-handed. Behind even this official facade of equality lurked naked racism: After the Brownsville incident, many in Congress urged that blacks be formally barred from entering the service academies, and that all black non-commissioned officers in the armed forces be stripped of their rank.

It is against this historical backdrop that the call for the creation of a training camp for black officers was made. Many leaders in the black community foresaw American involvement in the conflict in Europe, and argued that blacks should serves, and that the Army should give black citizens the opportunity to train as officers. Prominent voices in the black community such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Kelly Miller, Fred R. Moore, and others called upon young African-American men to step up to volunteer for duty and become both an example of the loyalty and bravery of the African-American citizen, and a new generation of leaders for their community. As Wilson details, this call was not without controversy, both within and without the black community. Many white Americans opposed the idea of training black men as officers, mostly for predictably racist reasons: Black men were said to be fundamentally unfit for leadership, black men were inherently unreliable, black men were not intelligent enough to serve as officers, and so on. Many within the black community opposed such a training camp on far sounder grounds - the first reviving arguments made during the Spanish-American War which asked why black men should be asked to volunteer to defend liberty and democracy abroad when the society they lived in denied them the same at home. This is a quite reasonable question, and when one reads and outline of how African-American soldiers had been treated to that point, the question that comes to mind is not "why should blacks serve", but rather "why have blacks not deserted the nation in droves".

The second objection to the proposed camp from the black community was something of an extension of the first: The proposed camp was to be segregated. Black officer candidates were to train separately from white officer candidates, and given the Army's track record when it came to actually implementing equal treatment for black and white soldiers, having concerns in this area was entirely justified. Further, having a separate segregated training camp was also seen as an ideological affront, a statement from the government that black America was different from white America. While many modern day Americans are familiar with the Jim Crow laws segregating blacks from whites, many also have the somewhat blinkered view that such laws were the exclusive province of Southern states. The story of the creation of, and controversy surrounding, the training camp at Fort Des Moines should put these notions to rest: In the early part of the 20th century, the United States as a whole was remained an almost unapologetically racist society.

Despite these objections, the segregated Seventeenth Provisional Training Regiment was created - those who supported it reasoning that even though a segregated training camp was not an ideal solution, half of something was better than all of nothing. A call went out for volunteers, and around 1,250 men responded, drawn from among the best and brightest that the African-American community of that era had to offer as pleas went out for "doctors, lawyers, teachers, business men, and all those who graduated from high school" to enlist. Roughly a quarter of the men who responded had been educated at Howard University, the remainder from dozens of other institutions of higher learning. As Wilson details, the recruitment of this collection of volunteers was not without hiccups, but in retrospect it seems almost remarkable that so many men would choose to give of themselves to an institution that had proved so hostile to them for so long.

Although many prominent black leaders had hoped that Colonel Young would command the training regiment, but his forced retirement prevented that from happening. Instead, Colonel Charles C. Ballou was given the position, and as Wilson lays out, the work of transforming the volunteers into officers began. Much of the history of this process seems fairly unremarkable, although Wilson does highlight both the triumphs of the cadets, and the to be expected indignities heaped upon them. Des Moines was chosen because, as a northern city, it was believed that it would be more welcoming to the training regiment than a southern locale would be, and to a certain extent this was true. On the other hand, racism ran deep in American society, and there were some incidents that are documented as part of Wilson's narrative. More troubling were the obstacles the U.S. Army put in the way of the cadet's success. For his part, Ballou seems to have done his best to prepare the soldiers under his command for their role as officers, but the U.S. Army seems to have been determined to undermine them in sneaky ways. The officers trained at Fort Des Moines were only given infantry training, and were not to be allowed to enter active duty as artillery or communications officers. Later, when some officers were allowed to try their hand at artillery work, they were given little or no training in the use of the equipment, and then their predictably poor test scores were used as evidence that black officers were unsuited to that branch of the service. When all-black battalions were formed, they were divided and scattered across bases throughout the country so as to assuage fears that too many armed black men in one space would foment rebellion.

Time after time, through both official and unofficial means, overt and covert, the men of the Seventeenth Provisional Training Regiment found obstacles placed in their path due to their race. Even so, the bulk of the cadets completed their training and received commissions as officers. If one were to think that their path from there would be smooth, one would be mistaken. Not content with undermining their efforts during training, the U.S. Army continued to do so after the officers and their men were shipped off to France - turning a blind eye to insubordination by white soldiers, issuing orders limiting the freedom of black soldiers while on leave, making efforts to keep black soldiers out of combat lest they demonstrate that they were actually effective at the job, and even going so far as to try to tell the French army not to be too nice to the black soldiers when they were put under French command. Despite France's own less than sterling record in dealing with black troops recruited from their colonial holdings, the French were far more welcoming to the black American troops than their own white American countrymen had been. Ballou, now the commander of the all-black 92nd Division, lost pretty much any built up good will he had earned during his time commanding the Fort Des Moines training camp by issuing a series of orders that his black officers considered insulting and demeaning. Even when black soldiers were allowed into combat, their performance was denigrated in official reports that seem at odds with the other available evidence.

As Wilson's account demonstrates, the optimism and hope that fueled the push to create the training camp at Fort Des Moines and establish a corps of black officers within the U.S. Army proved to be misguided. Despite overcoming the obstacles placed in their way, the service and loyalty provided by black soldiers in World War I did little to change the attitudes of the society they lived in. On the other hand, what Wilson's account does show is that many of the men of the Seventeenth Provisional Training Regiment went on to become prominent voices in the black community resulting in an array of political leaders, legal scholars, academics, authors, and artists who shaped the course of the push for equality and justice over the decades following the war. Wilson leans perhaps a bit too heavily on the notion that their shared wartime experience was a prime factor in this development - after all the men who joined the the Seventeenth Provisional Training Regiment were already civic-minded enough to volunteer for service in answer to a call that asked them to give of themselves for a greater cause. There is something of a chicken and egg question here: Did the men whose stories are told in this book become leaders of their community because of their service as officers in the U.S. Army, or did they choose service as officers because they were already on their way to becoming leaders. Either way, their contributions cannot be overstated, and their sacrifices should not be forgotten.

Wilson is exceptionally thorough in his reporting, at times perhaps too thorough, as there are a few places where the book gets a bit repetitive. Even so, African American Army Officers of World War I recounts an important chapter in U.S. history - a chapter of the kind that is far too often overlooked, and which should not be. Wilson's account tells the story of men who not only stood up to be counted in their nation's time of need, their actions forced their nation to begin to live up to its ideals. This is the history of the worst aspects of the United States, but at the same time an account of the nobility that has made the country better than it was before. For anyone who has an interest in the full account of the history of the United States, this book is likely to be a fascinating read.

Adam P. Wilson     Book Reviews A-Z     Home

Monday, June 13, 2016

Musical Monday - Nun Fight by Paul & Storm


In just under two weeks, I'll be going to see Johnathan Coulton and Paul & Storm perform live. I have several of their albums, and all of the are great, but both acts really are at their very best live. The song Nun Fight is a perfect example of this: The studio version is technically perfect and an enjoyable song to listen to, but there is something wonderful about the pair of singers playing off of the reactions of the audience when they perform it live. The choreography, the pauses to account for laughter, the banter before the song - it all adds up to an experience that simply cannot be replicated in the recording booth.

In this version, Paul & Storm perform the song in an actual cathedral, which makes it very easy to imagine that it is being performed in a "vast boxing cathedral". The best part of the song is when Paul screws up, a moment that is made even more hilarious when one considers how many times they have successfully performed the song (and I have seen more that one of those instances), because they simply take the error in stride, express a few choice thoughts, reset, and try again. The point of this post is pretty much "go and see Paul & Storm live if you can". You won't regret it.

Previous Musical Monday: What's Up by 4 Non Blondes
Subsequent Musical Monday: Time to Say Goodbye by Andrea Bocelli and Sarah Brightman

Paul & Storm     Musical Monday     Home

Sunday, June 12, 2016

2012 Hugo Award Longlist

The story revealed by the 2012 Hugo Longlist is how quickly the Game of Thrones television series became a dominant force among Hugo voters. Although the show only appeared one time on the official list of finalists where the entire first season of the show was nominated in the Long Form Dramatic presentation category, a perusal of the longlisted entries shows that two individual episodes garnered enough nominations to be eligible for finalist slots in the Short Form Dramatic Presentation category, and three others were close behind. Because the producers of the show apparently elected to have the entire season of the show considered in the Long Form category, the individual episodes were declared ineligible and replaced on the ballot by other entries, but this means that fully half of the episodes of the first season of Game of Thrones were popular enough to be nominated to the longlist, which is quite an impressive achievement.

I noted when I put together the 2013 Longlist that as I work further back in time that the records concerning the nominees will become less and less comprehensive. In 2013, the names of the editors and other participants in the longlisted nominees for the categories of Semi-Prozine, Fanzine, and Fancast were left out of the official records reported by the 2013 Hugo Administrators. In 2012, the names of some of the editors and participants in those categories who appeared on the list of finalists were left out of the reported post-Award statistics. This is not an insurmountable problem, as this data can still be found elsewhere, but it is notable how quickly the records seem to be deteriorating in quality as I work my way backward in time. One entry in the fanzine category has me somewhat puzzled, as it is listed in the official post-Award statistics only as "el" with nothing further provided. I have looked for "el" in the context of fanzines, but this sort of search returns so many Spanish language fanzines that figuring out which one is the right one. There is also the possibility that this entry is an error, and "el" is a truncated portion of the name of some fanzine that got accidentally trimmed off somewhere. Either way, this is likely to remain a mystery unless someone who was directly involved can shed some light on the issue.

Addendum: David D. Levine has shed some light on the "el" mystery. It appears likely that "el" is actually "eI" a fanzine published and edited by Earl Kemp that enjoyed a ten year run before folding up shop in 2012.

Best Novel

Finalists:
Among Others by Jo Walton
A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin
Deadline by Mira Grant
Embassytown by China Mieville
Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey

Longlisted Nominees:
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Children of the Sky by Vernor Vinge
Deathless by Catherynne M. Valente
Fuzzy Nation by John Scalzi
The Kingdom of the Gods by N.K. Jemisin
Mechanique by Genevieve Valentine
The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
Rule 34 by Charles Stross
The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss
Zoo City by Lauren Beukes

Best Novella

Finalists:
Countdown by Mira Grant
The Ice Owl by Carolyn Ives Gilman
Kiss Me Twice by Mary Robinette Kowal
The Man Who Bridged the Mist by Kij Johnson
The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary by Ken Liu
Silently and Very Fast by Catherynne M. Valente

Longlisted Nominees:
The Adakian Eagle by Bradley Denton
The Alchemist by Paolo Bacigalupi
Angel of Europa by Allen M. Steele
The Ants of Flanders by Robert Reed
Gravity Dreams by Stephen Baxter
Lord John and the Plague of Zombies by Diana Gabaldon
Martian Chronicles by Cory Doctorow
The Rat Race by Cherie Priest
With Unclean Hands by Adam-Troy Castro

Best Novelette

Finalists:
The Copenhagen Interpretation by Paul Cornell
Fields of Gold by Rachel Swirsky
Ray of Light by Brad Torgersen
Six Months, Three Days by Charlie Jane Anders
What We Found by Geoff Ryman

Longlisted Nominees
The Book of Phoenix (Excerpted from the Great Book) by Nnedi Okorafor
The Choice by Paul McAuley
Citizen-Astronaut by David D. Levine
Ghostweight by Yoon Ha Lee
A Long Walk Home by Jay Lake
The Migratory Pattern of Dancers by Katherine Sparrow
The Old Man and the Martian Sea by Alastair Reynolds
Sauerkraut Station by Ferrett Steinmetz
The Summer People by Kelly Link
A Small Price to Pay for Birdsong by K.J. Parker
White Lines on a Green Field by Catherynne M. Valente

Best Short Story

Finalists:
The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees by E. Lily Yu
The Homecoming by Mike Resnick
Movement by Nancy Fulda
The Paper Menagerie by Ken Liu
Shadow War of the Night Dragons: Book One: The Dead City: Prologue by John Scalzi

Longlisted Nominees
After the Apocalypse by Maureen McHugh
The Bread We Eat in Dreams by Catherynne M. Valente
The Drowner by Paedar O'Guilin
Goodnight Moons by Ellen Klages
Her Husband's Hand by Adam-Troy Castro
The Invasion of Venus by Stephen Baxter
Mama, We Are Zhenya, Your Son by Tom Crosshill
The Server and the Dragon by Hannu Rajaniemi
Tidal Forces by Caitlin Kiernan
Tying Knots by Ken Liu
Unlimited Delta by Robin Walton
Younger Women by Karen Joy Fowler

Best Related Work

Finalists:
The Anticipation Novelists of 1950s French Science Fiction: Stepchildren of Voltaire by Bradford Lyau [ineligible]
The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, 3rd Edition edited by John Clute, David Langford, Peter Nicholls, and Graham Sleight
Jar Jar Binks Must Die . . . and Other Observations About Science Fiction Movies by Daniel M. Kimmel
The Steampunk Bible: An Illustrated Guide to the World of Imaginary Airships, Corsets and Goggles, Mad Scientists, and Strange Literature by Jeff VanderMeer and S.J. Chambers
Wicked Girls by Seanan McGuire
Writing Excuses, Season 6 by Mary Robinette Kowal, Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, and Dan Wells

Longlisted Nominees:
Evaporating Genres: Essays on Fantastic Literature by Gary K. Wolfe
In Other Worlds: SF and the Human Imagination by Margaret Atwood
Masters of Science Fiction and Fantasy Art: A Collection of the Most Inspiring Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Gaming Illustrators in the World by Karen Haber
Musings and Meditations by Robert Silverberg
Murray Leinster: The Life and Works by Jo-An J. Evans and Billee J. Stallings
Nested Scrolls: The Autobiography of Rudolf von Bitter Rucker by Rudy Rucker
Pardon This Intrusion: Fantastika in the World Storm by John Clute
Sightings: Reviews 2002-2006 by Gary K. Wolfe
Spectrum 18: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art by Arnie Fenner and Cathy Fenner
Whedonista: A Celebration of the Worlds of Joss Whedon by the Women Who Love Them by Lynne M. Thomas and Deborah Stanish

Best Graphic Story

Finalists:
Digger by Ursula Vernon
Fables, Volume 15: Rose Red by Bill Willingham and Mark Buckingham
Locke & Key, Volume 4: Keys to the Kingdom by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez
Schlock Mercenary: Force Multiplication by Howard Taylor
The Unwritten, Volume 4: Leviathan by Mike Carey and Peter Gross

Longlisted Nominees:
Anya's Ghost by Vera Brosgol
Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 8 by Joss Whedon
Doorways by George R.R. Martin and Stefano Martino
Fables, Volume 16: Super Team by Paul Cornell and Jimmy Broxton
Fevre Dream by George R.R. Martin, Daniel Abraham, and Rafa Lopez
Finder: Voice by Carla Speed McNeil
Freakangels, Volume 5 by Warren Ellis and Paul Duffield
Gunnerkrigg Court, Volume 3: Reason by Thomas Siddell
Habibi by Craig Thompson
Knight and Squire by Bill Willingham and Joao Ruas

Best Dramatic Presentation: Long Form

Finalists:
Captain America: The First Avenger
Game of Thrones, Season One
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2
Hugo
Source Code

Longlisted Nominees:
The Adjustment Bureau
Attack the Block
Contagion
Cowboys and Aliens
Kick-Ass
Misfits, Series 1
Paul
Rise of the Planet of the Apes
Super 8
Thor
X-Men: First Class

Best Dramatic Presentation: Short Form

Finalists:
Community: Remedial Chaos Theory
Doctor Who: The Doctor's Wife
Doctor Who: The Girl Who Waited
Doctor Who: A Good Man Goes to War
The Drink Tank's Hugo Acceptance Speech
Game of Thrones: Baelor [ineligible]
Game of Thrones: Fire and Blood [ineligible]
Game of Thrones: The Pointy End [ineligible]

Longlisted Nominees:
Being Human: The Wolf Shaped Bullet
Doctor Who: The Wedding of River Song
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
Fringe: The Day We Died
Fringe: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Game of Thrones: A Golden Crown
Game of Thrones: Winter Is Coming
Supernatural: The French Mistake

Best Professional Editor: Short Form

Finalists:
John Joseph Adams
Neil Clarke
Stanley Schmidt
Jonathan Strahan
Sheila Williams

Longlisted Nominees:
Scott H. Andrews
Ellen Datlow
Gardner Dozois
Liz Gorinsky
Susan Marie Groppi
Ann Leckie
George R.R. Martin
William Schafer
Catherynne M. Valente
Gordon van Gelder
Ann VanderMeer
Jeff VanderMeer

Best Professional Editor: Long Form

Finalists:
Lou Anders
Liz Gorinsky
Anne Lesley Groell
Patrick Nielsen Hayden
Betsy Wollheim

Longlisted Nominees:
Ginjer Buchanan
Julie A. Crisp
Moshe Feder
David G. Hartwell
Jeremy Lassen
Nick Mamatas
Beth Meacham
Devi Pillai
Eric Reynolds
Jacob Weisman
Toni Weisskopf

Best Professional Artist

Finalists:
Daniel Dos Santos
Bob Eggleton
Michael Komarck
Stephan Martiniére
John Picacio

Longlisted Nominees:
Vincent Chong
Julie Dillon
John Foster
Donato Giancolo
John Howe
Kekai Kotaki
Alan Lee
Chris McGrath
Lee Moyer
Randall Munroe
Ted Nasmith
Raymond Swanland
Michael Whelan

Best Semi-Prozine

Finalists:
Apex Magazine edited by Jason Sizemore, Lynne M. Thomas, and Catherynne M. Valente
Clarkesworld edited by Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Jason Heller [nomination declined]
Interzone edited by Andy Cox
Lightspeed edited by John Joseph Adams
Locus edited by Liza Groen Trombi and Kirsten Gong-Wong
New York Review of Science Fiction edited by Kris Dikeman, Avram Grumer, David G. Hartwell, and Kevin J. Maroney

Longlisted Nominees:
Ansible
Beneath Ceaseless Skies
Daily Science Fiction
Electric Velocipede
Escape Pod
Fantasy Magazine
Salon Futura
Shimmer
Strange Horizons
Weird Tale
s

Best Fanzine

Finalists:
Banana Wings edited by Claire Biraley and Mark Plummer
The Drink Tank edited by James Bacon and Chris Garcia
File 770 edited by Mike Glyer
Journey Planet edited by James Bacon, Chris Garcia, Emma J. King, Helen J. Montgomery, and Pete Young
SF Signal edited by John DeNardo, J.P. Frantz, and Patrick Hester

Longlisted Nominees:
Argentus
Challenger edited by Guy H. Lillian, III
Chunga
The Coode Street Podcast by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
A Dribble of Ink
eI edited by Earl Kemp
Pat's Fantasy Hotlist
SF Commentary
SF in SF
StarShipSofa by Tony C. Smith
The Wertzone
Yipe!

Best Fan Writer

Finalists:
James Bacon
Claire Brialey
Christopher J. Garcia
Jim C. Hines
Steven H. Silver

Longlisted Nominees:
Mike Glyer
Mette Hedin
David Langford
Guy H. Lillian, III
Cheryl Morgan
James Nicoll
Abigail Nussbaum
Mark Plummer
Abigail St. Denis
Adam Whitehead

Best Fan Artist

Finalists:
Brad W. Foster
Randall Munroe
Spring Schoenhuth
Maurine Starkey
Steve Stiles
Taral Wayne

Longlisted Nominees:
Alan F. Beck
Kurt Erichsen
Dave Hicks
Dick Jenssen
Sue Mason
Dan Steffan
D. West
Delphyne Woods
Frank Wu

Best Fancast

Finalists:
The Coode Street Podcast by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
Galactic Suburbia Podcast by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, and Tansy Rayner Roberts, produced by Andrew Finch
SF Signal Podcast by John DeNardo and J.P. Frantz, produced by Patrick Hester
SF Squeecast by Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Seanan McGuire, Lynne M. Thomas, and Catherynne M. Valente
StarShipSofa by Tony C. Smith

Longlisted Nominees:
Adventures in Sci Fi Publishing Podcast
Drabblecast
The Drink Tank Review of Books
Eric in the Elevator
Escape Pod by Mur Lafferty
Fanboy Planet Podcast by Ric Bretschneider
Geek Girl Crafts Podcast
I Should Be Writing by Mur Lafferty
The Nerdist
Podcastle
Radio Free Skaro by Warren Frey and Steve Schapansky
The Writer and the Critic by Kirstyn McDermott and Ian Mond
Writing Excuses by Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, and Dan Wells

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer

Finalists:
Mur Lafferty
Stina Leicht
Karen Lord
Brad Torgersen
E. Luly Yu

Longlisted Nominees:
Zen Cho
Ernest Cline
Ty Franck
Mark Hodder
Kat Howard
Kameron Hurley
Brit Mandelo
Sylvia Moreno-Garcia
Erin Morgenstern
Shauna Roberts

Go to previous year's longlist: 2011
Go to subsequent year's longlist: 2013

Go to 2012 Hugo Finalists and Winners

Hugo Longlist Project     Book Award Reviews     Home

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Book Blogger Hop June 10th - June 16th: Mia Hamm Scored 158 Goals in International Soccer Play

Book Blogger Hop

Jen at Crazy for Books restarted her weekly Book Blogger Hop to help book bloggers connect with one another, but then couldn't continue, so she handed the hosting responsibilities off to Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. The only requirements to participate in the Hop are to write and link a post answering the weekly question and then visit other blogs that are also participating to see if you like their blog and would like to follow them.

This week Billy asks: Are giveaways a part of your blog or only reviews?

I don't do giveaways. I don't do giveaways for much the same reason I don't participate in blog tours - I'm just not organized enough to be able to be able to commit to a particular schedule by which things will take place on this blog. I have numerous other commitments, and to be blunt, sometimes I have to let stuff on this blog slide. This past week I didn't post any reviews because I had fallen behind on some of the administrative and infrastructure work that holds the blog together and I spent my time playing catch-up on that. As long as the only person I am answerable to on the subject of scheduling material on this blog is me, then the only person I disappoint when I fall behind is me. If I were to start agreeing to do giveaways and blog tours, I know that I would fall behind schedule and run the risk of disappointing someone who isn't me. So I don't do either.


Book Blogger Hop     Home

Friday, June 10, 2016

Follow Friday - The Second Syrian War Started in 259 B.C.


It's Friday again, and this means it's time for Follow Friday. There has been a slight change to the format, as now there are two Follow Friday hosts blogs and a single Follow Friday Featured Blogger each week. To join the fun and make now book blogger friends, just follow these simple rules:
  1. Follow both of the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (Parajunkee and Alison Can Read) and any one else you want to follow on the list.
  2. Follow the Featured Blogger of the week - All the Doodles 'n Scribbles.
  3. Put your Blog name and URL in the Linky thing.
  4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments.
  5. Follow, follow, follow as many as you can, as many as you want, or just follow a few. The whole point is to make new friends and find new blogs. Also, don't just follow, comment and say hi. Another blogger might not know you are a new follower if you don't say "Hi".
  6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the love . . . and the followers.
  7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
  8. If you're new to the Follow Friday Hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
And now for the Follow Friday Question: What is your ALL TIME favorite book?

This is a tough question, because narrowing the choice down to just one book is almost impossible because there are so many excellent books that I have read. I could pick Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, or Delany's Nova, or Miller's Canticle for Liebowitz, or Lem's Cyberiad, or any number of other books that were simply brilliant and have stuck with me through the years.

But if I have to pick one book as the best I have read, and which I have gone back to more than any other, it will have to be the first book by Le Guin that I ever read: A Wizard of Earthsea. Although the book is only the first in the Earthsea series, which builds upon it and makes the characters and the world they live in even more compelling, the book stands by itself as quite simply the best story that I have ever read of a person coming of age and grappling with what kind of person they want to be. This is the book that introduced me to Le Guin's writing and started my love affair with her work, and for that and for the fact that it is a magnificent story, I will call this my favorite book.


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Monday, June 6, 2016

Musical Monday - What's Up by 4 Non Blondes


The right music can add so much to filmed fiction. This song isn't particularly nerdy by itself - it is essentially a relatively standard pop anthem dedicated to rebellion and extolling the counterculture. But when placed in this sequence in the series Sense8, it becomes a symbol of the growing connection between the sensates in the cluster at the heart of the story. Without getting too deep into spoiler territory, this scene is the first time we see all of the members of the cluster sharing the same moment - this is more or less when they take their first real step to becoming a unit. We've seen pairs or even trios of sensates work together before this scene, but they've never all been together at once.

It seems fitting that this moment is one of joy, mostly because the series is so frequently such a very dark story. This one moment is experienced by many of the sensates as one of almost unbridled joy: Riley enjoying a sunrise, Sun celebrating in the shower, Capheus behind the wheel, and Wolfgang and Kala sharing a song as part of their budding romance. But it is also bittersweet: Leto contemplates what his relationships might do to his career, and Will has just helped Nomi escape from being imprisoned by the villain Whispers (imprisonment that was aided by Nomi's own mother, who disapproves of Nomi's transition from being Michael to being Nomi). There is a kind of desperate happiness as Nomi sits sheltered in Amanita's arms as they drive away.

This scene has some foreboding too, and that is also part of what makes it brilliant: When Nomi shows up next to Riley, they share a moment, but don't realize that quite soon they will have much more in common with one another than they could ever imagine. We see Sun in her beautiful, huge glass shower in an apartment that is suitably ostentatious enough for the high-powered executive that she is, but know that this will all be taken away from her in the very near future. There are so many layers in this brief sequence, and the song that ties them all together just makes it all work so well.

Previous Musical Monday: Promises by the Cranberries

4 Non Blondes     Musical Monday     Home

Sunday, June 5, 2016

2013 Hugo Award Longlist

Because I am working my way backwards in time from 2015 for this project, I expect that the information available concerning the Hugo Longlists is going to become harder and harder to find. In 2013, the first indicator that this expectation is justified can be found in the Semi-Prozine, Fanzine, and Fancast categories, as the Hugo administrators seem to have simply not reported the editors or contributors to those works that did not make the list of finalists. This information can be found, but it will require research - and it may prove tricky in some cases, as many of the longlisted fanzines (for example) are online publications, so figuring out who was on their editorial staff in a particular year may be elusive.

The longlist for this year also reveals a couple of interesting twists in the story of the Hugo Awards. First, the entire second season of the Game of Thrones television show was nominated as a Long Form Dramatic Presentation finalist. The producers of the show apparently decided to decline this nomination so that the individual episode Blackwater could compete in the Short Form category, which turned out well. At the time this was something of a bold move as that category also included three Doctor Who episodes, and Doctor Who had been the short form juggernaut in the Short Form category since it had been created. Second, The Unwritten had two volumes appear on the longlist in the Graphic Story category, but neither garnered enough nominations to make the list of finalists. The series also received several rather unclear nominations, and the Hugo Administrators had to try to figure out if some of the nominations were for volume five, volume six, or the series as whole. This highlights the fact that being a Hugo Administrator is a job that requires judgment in addition to impartiality.

That judgment also came into play in the Novelette category, where Mary Robinette Kowal's story The Lady Astronaut of Mars was ruled ineligible on the basis that it had only been published as an audio book, and thus could only qualify in one of the dramatic presentation categories. This was kind of an odd decision, but there was some precedent for it - after all Mark Oshiro received nominations in the Short Form Dramatic Presentation Category for reading from the John Scalzi story Shadow War of the Night Dragons. On the other hand, Kowal is the author, not someone performing a reading of her work, and audio books are generally regarded as actually being books. In any event, this was the last time this came up, because the World Science Fiction Society passed an amendment to its Constitution specifying that audio books were eligible in the fiction categories.

Best Novel

Finalists:
2312 by Kim Stanley Robinson
Blackout by Mira Grant
Captain Vorpatril's Alliance by Lois McMaster Bujold
Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas by John Scalzi
Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed

Longlisted Nominees:
Caliban's War by James S.A. Corey
Existence by David Brin
Discount Armageddon by Seanan McGuire
The Drowning Girl by Caitlin R. Kiernan
Glamour in Glass by Mary Robinette Kowal
The Hydrogen Sonata by Iain M. Banks
The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin
Libromancer by Jim C. Hines
Monster Hunter Legion by Larry Correia
Railsea by China Mieville
Range of Ghosts by Elizabeth Bear

Best Novella

Finalists:
After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall by Nancy Kress
The Emperor's Soul by Brandon Sanderson
On a Red Station, Drifting by Aliette de Bodard
San Diego 2014: The Last Stand of the California Browncoats by Mira Grant

The Stars Do Not Lie by Jay Lake

Longlisted Nominees:
All the Flavors by Ken Liu
The Boolean Gate by Walter Jon Williams
Gods of Risk by James S.A. Corey
In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Sigil Burns by Elizabeth Bear
Katabasis by Robert Reed
The Last Judgment by James Patrick Kelly
Legion by Brandon Sanderson
Let Maps to Others by K.J. Parker
Murder Born by Robert Reed
Twenty Lights to the Land of Snow by Michael Bishop

Best Novelette

Finalists:
The Boy Who Cast No Shadow by Thomas Olde Heuvelt
Fade to White by Catherynne M. Valente
The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi by Pat Cadigan
The Lady Astronaut of Mars by Mary Robinette Kowal [ineligible] (reviewed in 2014 Hugo Voting - Best Novelette)
Rat-Catcher by Seanan McGuire
In Sea-Salt Tears by Seanan McGuire

Longlisted Nominees
Arbeitskraft by Nick Mamatas
Astrophilia by Carrie Vaughn
Close Encounters by Andy Duncan
The Finite Canvas by Brit Mandelo
Flight of the Runewright by Howard Tayler
The Ghosts of Christmas by Paul Cornell
Holmes Sherlock: A Hwarhath Mystery by Eleanor Arnason
Portrait of Lisane de Patagnia by Rachel Swirsky
Swift, Brutal Retaliation by Meghan McCarron
The Waves by Ken Liu

Best Short Story

Finalists:
Immersion by Aliette de Bodard
Mantis Wives by Kij Johnson
Mono no Aware by Ken Liu

Longlisted Nominees
Armless Maidens of the American West by Genevieve Valentine
The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species by Ken Liu
The Education of a Witch by Ellen Klages
Five Ways to Fall in Love on Planet Porcelain by Cat Rambo
The Flower of Arizona by Seanan McGuire
My Wife Hates Time Travel by Adam-Troy Castro
No Place Like Home by Seanan McGuire
One Hell of a Ride by Seanan McGuire
Robot by Helena Bell
A Tall Tale by Charles Stross
Tyche and the Ants by Hannu Rajaniemi
Valedictorian by N.K. Jemisin
We Will Not Be Undersold! by Seanan McGuire
The Wizard of 34th Street by Mike Resnick

Best Related Work

Finalists:
The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature by Edward James and Farah Mendelsohn
Chicks Dig Comics: A Celebration of Comic Books by the Women Who Love Them edited by Lynne M. Thomas and Sigrid Ellis
Chicks Unravel Time: Women Journey Through Every Season of Doctor Who edited by Deborah Stanish and L.M. Myles
I Have an Idea for a Book . . . The Bibliography of Martin Harry Greenberg compiled by Martin H. Greenberg, edited by John Helfers
Writing Excuses, Season Seven by Brandon Sanderson, Dan Wells, Mary Robinette Kowal, Howard Taylor, and Jordan Sanderson

Longlisted Nominees:
24 Frames into the Future: Scalzi on Science Fiction Films by John Scalzi
Beyond the Wall: Exploring George R.R. Martin's a Song of Ice and Fire edited by James Lowder
Distrust that Particular Flavor by William Gibson
A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook by Chelsea Monroe-Cassel and Sariann Lehrer
Frank R. Paul: The Dean of Science Fiction Illustration by Jerry Weist
Hank Reinhardt's Book of Knives: A Practical, Illustrated Guide to Knife Fighting by Hank Reinhardt
The John Picacio 2013 Calendar by John Picacio
Reflections: On the Magic of Writing by Diana Wynne Jones
Science Fiction: The 101 Best Novels 1985-2010 by Damien Broderick and Paul Di Filippo
Some Remarks: Essays and Other Writings by Neal Stephenson
We Wuz Published: Joanna Russ, Radical Truth-Telling by Brit Mandelo
World SF in Translation by Jari Koponen

Best Graphic Story

Finalists:
Grandville Bête Noir by Bryan Talbot
Locke & Key, Volume 5: Clockworks by Joe Hill, Illustrated by Gabriel Rodriguez
Saga, Volume One by Brian K. Vaughan, Illustrated by Fiona Staples
Saucer Country, Volume 1: Run by Paul Cornell, Illustrated by Jimmy Broxton, Ryan Kelly, and Goran Sudzuka
Schlock Mercenary: Random Access Memorabilia by Howard Taylor

Longlisted Nominees:
Batgirl, Vol. 1: The Darkest Reflection by Gail Simone, illustrated by Adrian Syaf
Captain Marvel, Vol. 1: In Pursuit of Flight by Kelly Sue DeConnick, illustrated by Emma Rios and Dexter Soy
Dial H, Volume 1: Into You by China Miéville, illustrated by Mateus Santolouco
Hawkeye, Volume 1: My Life as a Weapon by Matt Fraction, illustrated by David Aja
The Massive by Brian Wood, illustrated by Garry Brown, Kristian Donaldson, and Dave Stewart
The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1: Science Bad by Jonathan Hickman, illustrated by Nick Pitarra
Morning Glories by Nick Spencer, illustrated by Joe Eisma
The Situation by Jeff VanderMeer, illustrated by Eric Orchard
The Unwritten by Mike Carey, illustrated by Peter Gross
The Unwritten, Vol. 5: On to Genesis by Mike Carey, illustrated by Peter Gross
The Unwritten, Vol. 6: Tommy Taylor and the War of Words by Mike Carey, illustrated by Peter Gross
A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel by Madeleine L'Engle, illustrated by Hope Larson

Best Dramatic Presentation: Long Form

Finalists:
The Avengers
The Cabin in the Woods
Game of Thrones, Season Two [nomination declined]
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
The Hunger Games
Looper

Longlisted Nominees:
Beasts of the Southern Wild
Brave
Chronicle
Cloud Atlas
The Dark Knight Rises
Dredd
Iron Sky
John Carter
Prometheus
Wreck-It Ralph

Best Dramatic Presentation: Short Form

Finalists:
Doctor Who: The Angels Take Manhattan
Doctor Who: Asylum of the Daleks
Doctor Who: The Snowmen
Fringe: Letters of Transit
Game of Thrones: Blackwater

Longlisted Nominees:
Castle: The Final Frontier
Chronicle
Community: Digital Estate Planning
Doctor Who: Dinosaurs on a Spaceship
Doctor Who: The Power of Three
Doctor Who: A Town Called Mercy
Game of Thrones: Valar Morghulis
Mark Reads "The Shadow War of the Night Dragons - Book One: The Dead City" by Mark Oshiro
Paperman
Phineas and Ferb: Excaliferb
An Unexpected Briefing

Best Professional Editor: Short Form

Finalists:
John Joseph Adams
Neil Clarke
Stanley Schmidt
Jonathan Strahan
Sheila Williams

Longlisted Nominees:
Scott H. Andrews
Ellen Datlow
Nick Mamatas
Brit Mandelo
Patrick Nielsen Hayden
Lynne Thomas
Gordon van Gelder
Anne VanderMeer
Terri Windling

Best Professional Editor: Long Form

Finalists:
Lou Anders
Sheila Gilbert
Liz Gorinsky
Patrick Nielsen Hayden
Toni Weisskopf

Longlisted Nominees:
Ginjer Buchanan
Malcolm Edwards
Anne Lesley Groell
Lee Harris
David G. Hartwell
Jeremy Lassen
Beth Meacham
Jim Minz
Devi Pillai
Betsy Wollheim

Best Professional Artist

Finalists:
Vincent Chong
Julie Dillon
Dan Dos Santos
Chris McGrath
John Picacio

Longlisted Nominees:
Alejandro Colucci
Bob Eggleton
Donato Gioncola
Joey Hi-Fi (aka D. Halvorsen)
John Howe
Michael Komark
Alan Lee
Todd Lockwood
Stephan Martiniere
Howard Tayler

Best Semi-Prozine

Finalists:
Apex Magazine edited by Lynne M. Thomas, Jason Sizemore, and Michal Damien Thomas
Beneath Ceaseless Skies edited by Scott H. Andrews
Clarkesworld edited by Neil Clarke, Kate Baker, Jason Heller, and Sean Wallace
Lightspeed edited by John Jospeh Adams and Stefan Rudnicki
Strange Horizons edited by Rebecca Cross, Niall Harrison, Jed Hartman, Brit Mandelo, Dave Nagdeman, Abigail Nussbaum, An Owomoyela, Julia Rios, and Sonya Taaffe

Longlisted Nominees:
Cascadia Subduction Zone
Daily Science Fiction
Escape Pod
Goblin Fruit
Interzone
Locus
New York Review of Science Fiction
On Spec
Shimmer
Stone Telling

Best Fanzine

Finalists:
Banana Wings edited by Claire Biraley and Mark Plummer
The Drink Tank edited by James Bacon and Chris Garcia
Elitist Book Reviews edited by Steven Diamond
Journey Planet edited by James Bacon, Chris Garcia, Emma J. King, Helen J. Montgomery, and Pete Young
SF Signal edited by John DeNardo, J.P. Frantz, and Patrick Hester

Longlisted Nominees:
Ansible
Argentus
The Book Smugglers
Challenger
Chunga
File 770 edited by Mike Glyer
The Mary Sue
SF Mistressworks
Trap Door
World SF Blog
Yipe!

Best Fan Writer

Finalists:
James Bacon
Christopher J. Garcia
Mark Oshiro
Tansy Rayner Roberts
Steven H. Silver

Longlisted Nominees:
Liz Bourke
Claire Brialey
N.K. Jemisin
Guy H. Lillian III
Seanan McGuire
Foz Meadows
A Cracked Moon
Cheryl Morgan
Abigail Nussbaum
Charles Tan

Best Fan Artist

Finalists:
Galen Dara
Brad W. Foster
Spring Schoenhuth
Maurine Starkey
Steve Stiles

Longlisted Nominees:
Sue Beatrice
Jim Hines and Amy Hines
Kathleen Jennings
Randall  Munroe
Hildy Pearlman
Melody Rondeau
Espana Sheriff
Katy Shuttleworth
Dan Steffan
Noelle Stephenson
Taral Wayne

Best Fancast

Finalists:
The Coode Street Podcast by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
Galactic Suburbia Podcast by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, and Tansy Rayner Roberts, produced by Andrew Finch
SF Signal Podcast by John DeNardo, J.P. Frantz, and Patrick Hester
SF Squeecast by Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Seanan McGuire, Lynne M. Thomas, and Catherynne M. Valente, produced by David McHone-Chase
StarShipSofa by Tony C. Smith

Longlisted Nominees:
Escape Pod by Mur Lafferty
Fanboy Planet Podcast by Ric Bretschneider
I Should Be Writing by Mur Lafferty
Nerdvana by J.C. Arkham and Two-Buck Chuck
Outer Alliance Podcast by Julia Rios
Radio Free Skaro by Warren Frey and Steve Schapansky
SF Crossing the Gulf by Karen Burnham and Karen Lord
Speculate! The Podcast for Writers and Fans by Gregory A. Wilson, Brad P. Beaulieu, and Michael R. Underwood
Sword and Laser by Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt
The Writer and the Critic by Kirstyn McDermott and Ian Mond
Writing Excuses by Brandon Sanderson, Howard Tayler, and Dan Wells

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer

Finalists:
Madeleine Ashby [withdrawn]
Zen Cho
Max Gladstone
Mur Lafferty
Stina Leicht
Chuck Wendig

Longlisted Nominees:
Brooke Bolander
Adam Christopher
Thoraiya Dyer
Damien Walters Grintalis
Rachel Hartman
Brit Mandelo
E.C. Myers
Jeff Salyards
Cory Skerry

Go to previous year's longlist: 2012
Go to subsequent year's longlist: 2014

Go to 2013 Hugo Finalists and Winners

Hugo Longlist Project     Book Award Reviews     Home

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Book Blogger Hop June 3rd - June 9th: Gaius Marius, Reformer of the Roman Army, Was Born in 157 B.C.

Book Blogger Hop

Jen at Crazy for Books restarted her weekly Book Blogger Hop to help book bloggers connect with one another, but then couldn't continue, so she handed the hosting responsibilities off to Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. The only requirements to participate in the Hop are to write and link a post answering the weekly question and then visit other blogs that are also participating to see if you like their blog and would like to follow them.

This week Billy asks: Do you reply to every comment on your posts?

I will conditionally answer this question with a yes. I moderate all comments, mostly because I have had a number of obnoxious individuals show up and try to pollute the comments with asinine bullshit. For rather obvious reasons, I don't reply to comments that I don't allow through moderation.

For comments that I approve for publication, I try to make sure I respond. I figure that if someone takes the effort to make a coherent and intelligent comment on one of my blog posts, I should do them the courtesy of responding.


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Friday, June 3, 2016

Follow Friday - Two Hundred and Fifty-Eight Is Six Cubed Plus Six Squared Plus Six


It's Friday again, and this means it's time for Follow Friday. There has been a slight change to the format, as now there are two Follow Friday hosts blogs and a single Follow Friday Featured Blogger each week. To join the fun and make now book blogger friends, just follow these simple rules:
  1. Follow both of the Follow My Book Blog Friday Hosts (Parajunkee and Alison Can Read) and any one else you want to follow on the list.
  2. Follow the Featured Blogger of the week - I Heart Reading.
  3. Put your Blog name and URL in the Linky thing.
  4. Grab the button up there and place it in a post, this post is for people to find a place to say hi in your comments.
  5. Follow, follow, follow as many as you can, as many as you want, or just follow a few. The whole point is to make new friends and find new blogs. Also, don't just follow, comment and say hi. Another blogger might not know you are a new follower if you don't say "Hi".
  6. If someone comments and says they are following you, be a dear and follow back. Spread the love . . . and the followers.
  7. If you want to show the link list, just follow the link below the entries and copy and paste it within your post!
  8. If you're new to the Follow Friday Hop, comment and let me know, so I can stop by and check out your blog!
And now for the Follow Friday Question: What is your most interesting bookish memory or experience?

One of my earliest bookish memories is reading The Hobbit for the first time. When I was about eight or nine, my father started reading the book to me as a bedtime story over the summer, one page at a time, perhaps inspired by the truncated version of the Rankin-Bass movie broadcast on television. We made it about a third of the way through the book before school started again and the reading sessions just kind of petered out roughly a third of the way through the story.

Cue to a year or two later. We had moved to Tanzania in the interim, and I picked up The Hobbit on an evening in the summer break between, my fourth and fifth grade years and started reading. I began some time just before my normal bed time, and didn't put the book down until I had finished it, just as the first rays of dawn began to appear over the horizon. I finished the Lord of the Rings over the next week. When the school year rolled around, I hunted through the library looking for fantasy novels to read. By spring break of the next school year I was reading the Silmarillion.

Although it isn't explicitly reading related, I have another memory from Tanzania that seems relevant. I was living in Tanzania because my father was working for the U.S. Embassy there, in the Consular office. In 1980, Muhammad Ali visited the country. I didn't know it at the time, but he was there to try to convince Tanzania to join the U.S.-led boycott of the 1980 Olympics. What I do remember was going with my father to meet him at the airport. There were hundred, or perhaps thousands of enthusiastic Tanzanians who also showed up to greet the boxing champion. They jumped over barricades, and met him in a cheering crowd as he emerged from the plane, sending up cries of "Ali!". What I remember was seeing this crowd and seeing their excitement and realizing he was their hero. His accomplishments made them proud. Made them feel like they counted. Because he was black. Because he was Muslim. Because he was one of them. I didn't have the words to describe it then, but it was at that moment that I understood that representation matters.


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